Why Language Matters When We Talk About Mental Health _ MHA Re-blog

On 2019-03-02, scarlettcat wrote:

Scarlett's BPD Corner

humanoid figure with a speech balloon above his head

You should never be defined by your condition. You have some symptoms but you are much, much more than that. It happens that sometimes people with mental health conditions are seen as that label by others. You are identified by your condition: the schizophrenic guy, the bipolar girl, etc. It’s easy to confuse the condition with the person but we should never forget that behind that label is a very complex person that deserves respect.

Details matter and the fact that we say “Joan is Bipolar” instead of “Joan has Bipolar Disorder”. You are not your condition. You are still an individual, with its idiosyncrasies. Language matters a lot because it shapes our perception or is it the other way around? It doesn’t matter. What matters is that language stigmatizes people and that has real effects like refusal to seek treatment and anxiety when interacting with people.

People with mental…

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5 thoughts on “Why Language Matters When We Talk About Mental Health _ MHA Re-blog

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  1. As a former teacher, I recognize that the negative labels for one’s condition presupposes the permanency of this label. Government funding for the challenged populace depends on this trend

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    1. Agreed. permanency of the label is one major issue than can easily be overlooked. i have been meaning to say this for a long time, the author os this post covered it really well.

      you might have a disorder but you don’t become it. like we say we have fever we dont start calling ourself fever. Language makes a huge difference.

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    1. agreed. but it can have much adverse consequences when it comes to mental health. the things is, aknoledging, accepting, validating your own mental health issues takes a lot of courage and it’s a process. during all of that we are very vulnerables and it’s important how every word is said to us. hope i’m making sense.

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